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Pharmaceutics I & II: Home

PSC341 & PSC342

Pharmaceutics I - Physical Pharmacy and Dosage Forms

A.   Course Information

  1. Course Description: This course studies the physicochemical principles of drug delivery and pharmaceutical dosage forms. It introduces and integrates the physical, chemical and mathematical principles, theories, terminology, calculations and methodologies of physical pharmacy, dosage forms and drug delivery systems. The topics include introductions to pharmaceutics, principles and properties of solutions, solution dosage forms, properties of dispersions, dispersion dosage forms, preformulation, quality standards, new drug development and approval process. 
  2. Pre-requisites: BIO121, CHE122, PHY245 and MAT111, or Permission of instructor

B. Course Goals (outcomes)

            As the first course in the Integrated Pharmaceutics Sequence (Pharmaceutics I, II, and Pharmacokinetics), this course introduces the students with fundamental principles and theories of pharmacy. Pharmaceutics integrates and apply basics sciences (which students have learned from courses of mathematics, chemistry, physics, and biology) to the pharmaceutical sciences. Following the successful completion of this course, a student should be able to:

  1.  (C1, C2) Understand the physicochemical principles of dosage form design of solutions and dispersions; (1.1. Learner)
  2. (C1, C2) Apply these principles to analyze the basic drug delivery process and propose strategies to optimize therapeutic outcomes;   (1.1. Learner)
  3. (C4) Identify, differentiate, and define basic dosage forms of solution and dispersions;  Identify the basic pharmaceutical ingredients and excipients; qualitatively estimate the performance of dosage forms that are commonly used clinically; (1.1. Learner)
  4. (C3) Integrate and describe the principles of basic formulation design, and preliminarily evaluate their basic quality attributes such as stability;  (1.1. Learner; 2.2. Manager)
  5. (C4, D5) Perform basic mathematical calculation and problem-solving for pharmaceutical questions during practice, or be able to find professional resources or consultations; (1.1. Learner; 2.3 strategist; 3.1. problem-solver)
  6. (C1) Apply knowledge and skills of Pharmaceutics to other courses, future licensure exams and professional practice (e.g. basic compounding by pharmacists), and/or patient-centric product research and development; (1.1. Learner)
  7. (A1) (C1) Recognize the continuous advancement of industrial pharmacy and regulatory science: recognize patient-centric product design, development, approvals by regulatory agencies, commercialization and the quality standards such as USP. (1.1. Learner)

Pharmaceutics II - Biopharmaceutics and Drug Delivery

        A.   Course Information

1.    Course Description: Pharmaceutics II studies the pharmaceutical dosage forms and drug delivery systems, on the foundations of physical pharmacy and biopharmaceutics. It discusses the application of physical, chemical, mathematical and biological principles to patient-centric drug products design. The commonly used pharmaceutical ingredients and methods of preparation and manufacture are also introduced. The modular topics include biopharmaceutics principles, topical and transdermal delivery; oral drug delivery and solid dosage forms; parenterals, sterile products, and biotechnology products; nasal and pulmonary drug delivery, specialty products, advanced drug delivery systems and drug delivery/targeting strategies.

2.    Pre-requisites: Pharmaceutics I or Permission of instructor

 

B. Course Goals (outcomes): Upon the completion of this integrated course as the second in the Integrated Pharmaceutics sequence (Pharmaceutics I, II, and Pharmacokinetics), students should be able to:

  1. Explain the physical, chemical, mathematical, and biological principles of drug product design for basic dosage forms and drug delivery systems; (1.1. Learner)
  2. Summarize the principles of drug delivery and basic ADME, and apply these principles to analyze the drug delivery process and ADME to propose strategies to optimize therapeutic outcomes; (1.1. Learner; 2.3. Promoter/Strategist)
  3. Interpret the ingredients, materials and methods used in drug produce preparation and manufacture, and perform basic calculations for dosage form formulation design; (1.1. Learner; 2.3 strategist; 3.2. educator)
  4. Apply product design principles to preliminarily evaluate the basic quality attributes such as stability; (1.1. Learner; 2.2. Manager; 3.2. educator)
  5. Perform basic mathematical calculations and problem-solving for pharmaceutical questions during professional practices, or be able to find professional resources or consultations; (1.1. Learner; 2.3 strategist; 3.1. problem-solver; 4.1. Self-Aware)
  6. Apply pharmaceutics knowledge and skills to other courses, future licensure exams and practices (e.g. basic compounding and sterile product preparation by pharmacists), and/or patient-centric product research and development; (1.1. Learner)
  7. Recognize the continuous advancements of industrial pharmacy and regulatory science when being introduced to patient-centric product design, development, approval, manufacturing and quality control. (1.1. Learner)